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Smoking

Derbyshire Healthcare is currently on a journey to becoming a smoke-free Trust, thus providing cleaner and healthier environments to everyone involved with the Trust.

This means that, from 9 March 2016, all staff, service receivers and visitors will not be allowed to smoke anywhere on our sites - including wards, grounds, vehicles and during home visits. This is also likely to include the use of e-cigarettes. 

Smoking: the facts

Smoking is the main cause of preventable illness and premature death. Currently in the UK, approximately 21% of the population smoke, costing the NHS £13.74 billion every year. According to the Royal College of Psychiatrists, two out of every five cigarettes in England are smoked by people with mental health problems; this supports that people with a mental illness who smoke are more likely to be heavier smokers and more tobacco dependent than smokers in the general population. Often smoking leads to a poorer physical health and a lower life expectancy.

Smoking cigarettes can also increase how quickly some anti-psychotics are broken down by the body, meaning that people who smoke heavily may need more medication than those who do not.

It doesn't have to be this way and at Derbyshire Healthcare we want to discourage smoking by creating a smoke-free environment across all of our sites. We firmly believe in and agree with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance which recommends that all hospital sites, including mental health hospitals, should be free from smoke. 

Smoking cessation support

Our staff will receive training prior to the Trust becoming a smoke-free organisation so that they are fully equipped to offer the people under our care and our staff with the best smoking cessation advice and a full package of support.

Support services are available locally to help people who wish to reduce their smoking habits, quit permanently, or prepare to go smoke-free for a period of time. These services include:

Support is also available on our live well: stop smoking section. Alternatively, please visit the national smoke-free website for more information and advice or call 0300 123 1044 to speak to an expert adviser.

Your feedback: share your views

Whilst we're on this journey we would like to learn from others and hear your feedback and views about becoming a smoke-free Trust. So if you are a smoker or non-smoker and would like to share your thoughts with us, please email smokefree@derbyshcft.nhs.uk.

Local Stop smoking services:

Click here to visit Derbyshire County Stop Smoking service or telephone 0800 085 22 99 or email dcss@dchs.nhs.uk

Click here for Live Well smoking cessation services in Derby City or call 01332 641254 or email livewell@derby.gov.uk

Click here for the National Stop Smoking Service

Click here for the link to NoSmokingDay (for people who want to quit)

Stopping Smoking

A breath of fresh air..

Do you look forward to it and the chance it provides to relax?  Or does it dictate where you go and what you do?  If you spend your time panicking about when you can have the next one, or cramming as many in as you can in your break, then maybe it’s time to think about binning those cigarettes.

We all know the health risks involved, but we all work hard so a little of what you fancy does you good.  Right?  Wrong.  Smoking kills half of all long-term users and is the main single cause of avoidable premature death in the U.K.  There’s also the effect of smoking on others.  For instance, in England around 50 children are admitted to hospital each day with conditions, such as asthma attacks and middle ear infections, because of exposure to second-hand smoke.

If you sometimes find it frustrating when you suspect your service users lifestyles are not helping their overall health, picture yourself as the patient, suffering with a chest condition. What would you say to yourself about smoking?

As NHS staff we are all very focused on the health of others, but no matter how busy we are, (or invincible we think we may be!) we deserve to give some priority to our own health and future.  And we know that service users take their cues from us so if we’ve been through the experience too they’re more likely to listen and act on our advice.  If you’ve stopped smoking, or know someone who has, this really helps, as we know that patients enjoy listening to others’ experiences.

  • Stopping smoking is possible – there are over 11 million ex-smokers in the UK to prove it.
  • You are four times more likely to quit with an NHS Stop Smoking Service than by going it alone.
  • There are a range of products available to help you to quit including nicotine replacement products (patches, gum etc.).
  • It’s not too late to think about stopping and it will be of benefit whatever your age.
  • Stopping smoking in pregnancy will protect your baby from harmful effects of smoking and stopping for good will protect children in the long term.

 

Plus there are all the other benefits, such as having more money, being able to taste your food, regaining your sense of smell (and smelling better to others!) and so on….

When you stop smoking the benefits soon kick in:

  • Within 20 minutes your blood pressure and pulse should return to normal and your circulation improve, especially to hands and feet.
  • Eight hours later your blood oxygen levels will return to normal and your chances of having a heart attack start to fall.
  • Five years later your risk of having a heart attack will be half of that of a smoker.
  • Ten years later your risk of lung cancer falls to about half of that of a smoker and your risk of a heart attack is about the same as someone who has never smoked.